Marsilia Vs Essays

Coordinates: 43°15′41″N5°23′47″E / 43.261323°N 5.396261°E / 43.261323; 5.396261

The Unité d'habitation (French pronunciation: ​[ynite dabitasjɔ̃], Housing Unit) is a modernist residential housing design principle developed by Le Corbusier, with the collaboration of painter-architect Nadir Afonso. The concept formed the basis of several housing developments designed by him throughout Europe with this name. The most famous of these developments is located in south Marseille.

Cité radieuse, Marseille[edit]

The first and most famous of these buildings, also known as Cité radieuse (Radiant City) and, informally, as La Maison du Fada (French – Provençal, "The Nutter's House"), is located in Marseille, France, and was built between 1947 and 1952. One of Le Corbusiers's most famous works, it proved enormously influential and is often cited as the initial inspiration of the Brutalist architectural style and philosophy.[1]

The building is constructed in béton brut (rough-cast concrete), as the hoped-for steel frame proved too expensive in light of post-War shortages.[1] In July 2016, the Unité in Marseille and several other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.[2] It is also designated a historic monument by the French Ministry of Culture. It was damaged by fire on February 9, 2012.[3][4]

The Marseille building, developed with Corbusier's designers Shadrach Woods and George Candilis, comprises 337 apartments arranged over twelve stories, all suspended on large piloti. The building also incorporates shops with an architectural bookshop,[5] a rooftop gallery, educational facilities, a hotel which is open to the public,[6] and a gastronomic restaurant, Le Ventre de l'architecte ("The Belly of an Architect").

Inside, corridors run through the centre of the long axis of every third floor of the building, with each apartment lying on two levels, and stretching from one side of the building to the other, with a balcony. Corbusier's design was criticised by US architect Peter Blake for having small children's rooms and some of those rooms lacked windows.[7] Unlike many of the inferior system-built blocks it inspired, which lack the original's generous proportions, communal facilities and parkland setting, the Unité is popular with its residents and is now mainly occupied by upper middle-class professionals.

The flat roof is designed as a communal terrace with sculptural ventilation stacks, a running track, and a shallow paddling pool for children. There is also a children's art school in the atelier. The roof, where a number of theatrical performances have taken place, underwent renovation in 2010 and since 2013 it hosts an exhibition center called the MaMo.[8] The roof has unobstructed views of the Mediterranean and Marseille.

According to Peter Blake, members of CIAM held a "great celebration" for the building's opening on the roof on a summer evening in 1953. "Architects from every part of the world attended", including Walter Gropius, who said at the event: "Any architect who does not find this building beautiful, had better lay down his pencil."[9]

Other buildings and influences[edit]

In the block's planning, the architect drew on his study of the Soviet communal housing project, the Narkomfin Building in Moscow, which had been designed by the architect Moisei Ginzburg and completed in 1932.

Le Corbusier's utopian city living design was repeated in four more buildings with this name and a very similar design:

All of them were oriented with the building's long axis running north–south, so the units face east-and-west.[10]

The replacement material (béton brut) influenced the Brutalist movement, and the building inspired several housing complexes including the Alton West estate in Roehampton, London, and Park Hill in Sheffield. These buildings have attracted a great deal of criticism. Other, more successful, manifestations of the Unité include Chamberlin, Powell and Bon's Barbican Estate (completed 1982), Gordon Tait's Samuda Estate, Isle of Dogs (1965), Ernő Goldfinger's Balfron Tower (1967), and Trellick Tower (1972), all in London. Another valuable complex strongly inspired with the idea was Za Żelazną Bramą Housing Estate in Warsaw, Poland.

The Reserve Square Complex in Cleveland, Ohio which was built 1969–1973 was also influenced by Le Corbusier's project.

The Riverside Plaza in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which opened in 1973, also used multi-colored panels and brutalist design, as influenced by the project.

A building in Vukovarska street in Zagreb by architect Drago Galić was inspired by Le Corbusier's principles.

Interiors[edit]

The apartments were equipped with built-in furniture, and specially designed storage walls with various cupboards with sliding doors, which were designed by Charlotte Perriand in collaboration with Atelier Le Corbusier. Additionally Perriand collaborated on the design of the apartment kitchens, 321 of the 337 units were equipped with the Cuisine Atelier Le Corbusier, type 1 kitchens, many of which are still in place due to their efficient use of space.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Cité radieuse, Marseille.
Le Corbusier's Berlin Unité

This article is about the Mediterranean city. For other uses, see Marseille (disambiguation).

"Massilia" and "Marsiglia" redirect here. For other uses, see Massilia (disambiguation) and Marsiglia (disambiguation).

Marseille
Prefecture and commune

Flag

Coat of arms
Motto(s): Actibus immensis urbs fulget massiliensis
"The city of Marseille shines from its great achievements"

Marseille

Location within Provence-A.-C.d'A. region

Marseille

Coordinates: 43°17′47″N5°22′12″E / 43.2964°N 5.37°E / 43.2964; 5.37Coordinates: 43°17′47″N5°22′12″E / 43.2964°N 5.37°E / 43.2964; 5.37
CountryFrance
RegionProvence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
DepartmentBouches-du-Rhône
ArrondissementMarseille
Canton12 cantons
IntercommunalityAix-Marseille-Provence
Government
 • Mayor (since 1995)Jean-Claude Gaudin (LR)
Area1240.62 km2 (92.90 sq mi)
 • Urban (2010)1,731.91 km2 (668.69 sq mi)
 • Metro (2010)3,173.51 km2 (1,225.30 sq mi)
Population (Jan. 2013[1])2855,393
 • Rank2nd after Paris
 • Density3,600/km2 (9,200/sq mi)
 • Urban (2014)1,578,484[2]
 • Metro (Jan. 2011)1,831,500[3]
Demonym(s)Marseillais (French)
Marselhés (Occitan)
Massiliot (ancient)
Time zoneCET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST)CEST (UTC+2)
INSEE/Postal code13055 /13001-13016
Dialling codes0491 or 0496
Websitemarseille.fr

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Marseille (; French: [maʁsɛj] ( listen), locally [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Provençal: Marselha[maʀˈsejɔ, -ˈsijɔ]), also known in British English as Marseilles, is the second-largest city of France. The capital of the Bouches-du-Rhônedepartment and Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azurregion, it is located on France's south coast and had a population of 852,516 in 2012,[1] and an area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi), the third-largest metropolitan area in France after Paris and Lyon.[3]

Known to the ancient Greeks and Romans as Massalia[4] (Greek: Μασσαλία, Massalía),[page needed][6] Marseille was the most important trading centre in the region and the main commercial port of the French Republic. Marseille is now France's largest city on the Mediterranean coast and the largest port for commerce, freight and cruise ships. The city was European Capital of Culture, together with Košice, Slovakia, in 2013. It hosted the FIFA World Cup 1998 and the UEFA Euro 2016, and it was the European Capital of Sport in 2017. The city is home to several campuses of Aix-Marseille University and part of one of the largest metropolitan conurbations in France, the Metropolis of Aix-Marseille-Provence.

Geography[edit]

Marseille is the second-largest city in France after Paris and the centre of the third-largest metropolitan area in France after Paris and Lyon. To the east, starting in the small fishing village of Callelongue on the outskirts of Marseille and stretching as far as Cassis, are the Calanques, a rugged coastal area interspersed with small fjord-like inlets. Further east still are the Sainte-Baume (a 1,147 m (3,763 ft) mountain ridge rising from a forest of deciduous trees), the city of Toulon and the French Riviera. To the north of Marseille, beyond the low Garlaban and Etoile mountain ranges, is the 1,011 m (3,317 ft) Mont Sainte Victoire. To the west of Marseille is the former artists' colony of l'Estaque; further west are the Côte Bleue, the Gulf of Lion and the Camargue region in the Rhônedelta. The airport lies to the north west of the city at Marignane on the Étang de Berre.[7]

The city's main thoroughfare (the wide boulevard called the Canebière) stretches eastward from the Old Port to the Réformés quarter. Two large forts flank the entrance to the Old Port—Fort Saint-Nicolas on the south side and Fort Saint-Jean on the north. Further out in the Bay of Marseille is the Frioul archipelago which comprises four islands, one of which, If, is the location of Château d'If, made famous by the Dumas novel The Count of Monte Cristo. The main commercial centre of the city intersects with the Canebière at rue St Ferréol and the Centre Bourse (one of the city's main shopping malls). The centre of Marseille has several pedestrianised zones, most notably rue St Ferréol, Cours Julien near the Music Conservatory, the Cours Honoré-d'Estienne-d'Orves off the Old Port and the area around the Hôtel de Ville. To the south east of central Marseille in the 6th arrondissement are the Prefecture and the monumental fountain of Place Castellane, an important bus and metro interchange. To the south west are the hills of the 7th and 8th arrondissements, dominated by the basilica of Notre-Dame de la Garde. Marseille's main railway station—Gare de Marseille Saint-Charles—is north of the Centre Bourse in the 1st arrondissement; it is linked by the Boulevard d'Athènes to the Canebière.[7]

Climate[edit]

Marseille has a Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csa) with mild, humid winters and warm to hot, mostly dry summers. December, January, and February are the coldest months, averaging temperatures of around 12 °C (54 °F) during the day and 4 °C (39 °F) at night. July and August are the hottest months, averaging temperatures of around 28–30 °C (82–86 °F) during the day and 19 °C (66 °F) at night in the Marignane airport (35 km (22 mi) from Marseille) but in the city near the sea the average high temperature is 27 °C (81 °F) in July.[8]

Marseille is officially the sunniest major city in France with over 2,900 hours of sunshine while the average sunshine in France is around 1,950 hours. It is also the driest major city with only 512 mm (20 in) of precipitation annually, especially thanks to the Mistral, a cold, dry wind originating in the Rhône Valley that occurs mostly in winter and spring and which generally brings clear skies and sunny weather to the region. Less frequent is the Sirocco, a hot, sand-bearing wind, coming from the Sahara Desert. Snowfalls are infrequent; over 50% of years do not experience a single snowfall.

The hottest temperature was 40.6 °C (105.1 °F) on 26 July 1983 during a great heat wave, the lowest temperature was −14.3 °C (6.3 °F) on 13 February 1929 during a strong cold wave.[9]

Climate data for Marseille (Longchamp observatory) 43°18'21.2"N 5°23'37.1"E (1981–2010 averages, record highs and lows 1868–2003)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)21.2
(70.2)
22.7
(72.9)
26.1
(79)
28.6
(83.5)
33.2
(91.8)
36.9
(98.4)
40.6
(105.1)
38.6
(101.5)
33.8
(92.8)
30.9
(87.6)
24.3
(75.7)
23.1
(73.6)
40.6
(105.1)
Average high °C (°F)11.8
(53.2)
12.7
(54.9)
15.9
(60.6)
18.3
(64.9)
22.6
(72.7)
26.2
(79.2)
29.6
(85.3)
29.1
(84.4)
25.2
(77.4)
20.9
(69.6)
15.2
(59.4)
12.5
(54.5)
20.0
(68)
Daily mean °C (°F)8.4
(47.1)
8.9
(48)
11.6
(52.9)
13.8
(56.8)
17.9
(64.2)
21.3
(70.3)
24.5
(76.1)
24.1
(75.4)
20.7
(69.3)
16.9
(62.4)
11.8
(53.2)
9.3
(48.7)
15.8
(60.4)
Average low °C (°F)4.9
(40.8)
5.1
(41.2)
7.3
(45.1)
9.3
(48.7)
13.1
(55.6)
16.4
(61.5)
19.4
(66.9)
19.1
(66.4)
16.1
(61)
13.0
(55.4)
8.3
(46.9)
6.0
(42.8)
11.5
(52.7)
Record low °C (°F)−10.5
(13.1)
−14.3
(6.3)
−7.0
(19.4)
−3.0
(26.6)
0.0
(32)
4.7
(40.5)
8.5
(47.3)
8.1
(46.6)
0.0
(32)
−3.0
(26.6)
−6.9
(19.6)
−11.4
(11.5)
−14.3
(6.3)
Average precipitation mm (inches)51.1
(2.012)
32.1
(1.264)
30.7
(1.209)
51.1
(2.012)
38.7
(1.524)
23.5
(0.925)
7.6
(0.299)
27.9
(1.098)
71.6
(2.819)
78.6
(3.094)
58.0
(2.283)
52.3
(2.059)
523.2
(20.598)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm)5.54.54.06.14.32.51.32.44.16.16.15.852.6
Source #1: Météo France[9]
Source #2: Infoclimat.fr[10]
Climate data for Marignane (Aéroport Marseille Provence)43°26'18.4"N 5°12'51.9"E (1981–2010 averages, record highs and lows 1921–present)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)19.9
(67.8)
22.1
(71.8)
25.4
(77.7)
29.6
(85.3)
34.9
(94.8)
37.6
(99.7)
39.7
(103.5)
39.2
(102.6)
34.3
(93.7)
30.4
(86.7)
25.2
(77.4)
20.3
(68.5)
39.7
(103.5)
Average high °C (°F)11.4
(52.5)
12.5
(54.5)
15.8
(60.4)
18.6
(65.5)
22.9
(73.2)
27.1
(80.8)
30.2
(86.4)
29.7
(85.5)
25.5
(77.9)
20.9
(69.6)
15.1
(59.2)
11.9
(53.4)
20.2
(68.4)
Daily mean °C (°F)7.1
(44.8)
8.1
(46.6)
11.0
(51.8)
13.8
(56.8)
18.0
(64.4)
21.8
(71.2)
24.8
(76.6)
24.4
(75.9)
20.6
(69.1)
16.6
(61.9)
11.1
(52)
7.9
(46.2)
15.5
(59.9)
Average low °C (°F)2.9
(37.2)
3.6
(38.5)
6.2
(43.2)
9.1
(48.4)
13.1
(55.6)
16.6
(61.9)
19.4
(66.9)
19.0
(66.2)
15.7
(60.3)
12.4
(54.3)
7.2
(45)
4.0
(39.2)
10.8
(51.4)
Record low °C (°F)−12.4
(9.7)
−16.8
(1.8)
−10.0
(14)
−2.4
(27.7)
0.0
(32)
5.4
(41.7)
7.8
(46)
8.1
(46.6)
1.0
(33.8)
−2.2
(28)
−5.8
(21.6)
−12.8
(9)
−16.8
(1.8)
Average precipitation mm (inches)48.0
(1.89)
31.4
(1.236)
30.4
(1.197)
54.0
(2.126)
41.1
(1.618)
24.5
(0.965)
9.2
(0.362)
31.0
(1.22)
77.1
(3.035)
67.2
(2.646)
55.7
(2.193)
45.8
(1.803)
515.4
(20.291)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm)5.34.53.96.14.53.01.32.74.56.15.95.553.2
Average snowy days0.90.40.10.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.20.21.7
Average relative humidity (%)75726765646359626974757768.5
Mean monthly sunshine hours145.1173.7238.7244.5292.9333.4369.1327.4258.6187.1152.5134.92,857.8
Source #1: Météo France[11]
Source #2: Infoclimat.fr (humidity 1961–1990)[12]

History[edit]

Main articles: History of Marseille and Timeline of Marseille

Marseille was originally founded circa 600 BC as the Greek colony of Massalia and populated by settlers from Phocaea (modern Foça, Turkey). It became the preeminent Greek polis in the Hellenized region of southern Gaul. The city-state sided with the Roman Republic against Carthage during the Second Punic War (218-201 BC), retaining its independence and commercial empire throughout the western Mediterranean even as Rome expanded into Western Europe and North Africa. However, the city lost its independence following the Roman Siege of Massilia in 49 BC, during Caesar's Civil War, in which Massalia sided with the exiled faction at war with Julius Caesar.

Marseille continued to prosper as a Roman city, becoming an early center of Christianity during the Western Roman Empire. The city maintained its position as a premier maritime trading hub even after its capture by the Visigoths in the 5th century AD, although the city went into decline following the sack of 739 AD by the forces of Charles Martel. It became part of the County of Provence during the 10th century, although its renewed prosperity was curtailed by the Black Death of the 14th century and sack of the city by the Crown of Aragon in 1423. The city's fortunes rebounded with the ambitious building projects of René of Anjou, Count of Provence, who strengthened the city's fortifications during the mid-15th century. During the 16th century the city hosted a naval fleet with the combined forces of the Franco-Ottoman alliance, which threatened the ports and navies of Genoa and the Holy Roman Empire.

Marseille lost a significant portion of its population during the Great Plague of Marseille in 1720, but the population had recovered by mid century. In 1792 the city became a focal point of the French Revolution and was the birthplace of France's national anthem, La Marseillaise. The Industrial Revolution and establishment of the French Empire during the 19th century allowed for further expansion of the city, although it was occupied by the German Wehrmacht in November 1942 and subsequently heavily damaged during World War II. The city has since become a major center for immigrant communities from former French colonies, such as French Algeria.

Economy[edit]

Marseille is a major French centre for trade and industry, with excellent transportation infrastructure (roads, sea port and airport). Marseille Provence Airport, is the fourth largest in France. In May 2005, the French financial magazine L'Expansion named Marseille the most dynamic of France's large cities, citing figures showing that 7,200 companies had been created in the city since 2000.[13] Marseille is also France's second largest research centre with 3,000 research scientists within Aix Marseille University.[citation needed] As of 2014[update], the Marseille metropolitan area had a GDP amounting to $60.3 billion, or $36,127 per capita (purchasing power parity).[14]

Port[edit]

See also: Marseille-Fos Port

Historically, the economy of Marseille was dominated by its role as a port of the French Empire, linking the North African colonies of Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia with Metropolitan France. The Old Port was replaced as the main port for trade by the Port de la Joliette during the Second Empire and now contains restaurants, offices, bars and hotels and functions mostly as a private marina. The majority of the port and docks, which experienced decline in the 1970s after the oil crisis, have been recently redeveloped with funds from the European Union. Fishing remains important in Marseille and the food economy of Marseille is fed by the local catch; a daily fish market is still held on the Quai des Belges of the Old Port.

The economy of Marseille and its region is still linked to its commercial port, the first French port and the fifth European port by cargo tonnage, which lies north of the Old Port and eastern in Fos-sur-Mer. Some 45,000 jobs are linked to the port activities and it represents 4 billion euros added value to the regional economy.[15] 100 million tons of freight pass annually through the port, 60% of which is petroleum, making it number one in France and the Mediterranean and number three in Europe. However, in the early 2000s, the growth in container traffic was being stifled by the constant strikes and social upheaval.[16] The port is among the 20th firsts in Europe for container traffic with 1,062,408 TEU and new infrastructures have already raised the capacity to 2M TEU.[17] Petroleum refining and shipbuilding are the principal industries, but chemicals, soap, glass, sugar, building materials, plastics, textiles, olive oil, and processed foods are also important products.[citation needed] Marseille is connected with the Rhône via a canal and thus has access to the extensive waterway network of France. Petroleum is shipped northward to the Paris basin by pipeline. The city also serves as France's leading centre of oil refining.

Companies, services and high technologies[edit]

In recent years, the city has also experienced a large growth in service sector employment and a switch from light manufacturing to a cultural, high-tech economy.[citation needed] The Marseille region is home to thousands of companies, 90% of which are small and medium enterprises with less than 500 employees.[18][full citation needed] Among the most famous ones are CMA CGM, container-shipping giant; Compagnie maritime d'expertises (Comex), world leader in sub-sea engineering and hydraulic systems; Airbus Helicopters, an Airbus division; Azur Promotel, an active real estate development company; La Provence, the local daily newspaper; RTM, Marseille's public transport company; and Société Nationale Maritime Corse Méditerranée (SNCM), a major operator in passenger, vehicle and freight transportation in the Western Mediterranean. The urban operation Euroméditerranée has developed a large offer of offices and thus Marseille hosts one of the main business district in France.

Marseille is the home of three main technopoles: Château-Gombert (technological innovations), Luminy (biotechnology) and La Belle de Mai (17,000 sq.m. of offices dedicated to multimedia activities).[19][20]

Tourism and attractions[edit]

The port is also an important arrival base for millions of people each year, with 2.4 million including 890,100 from cruise ships.[15] With its beaches, history, architecture and culture (24 museums and 42 theatres), Marseille is one of the most visited cities in France, with 4.1 million visitors in 2012.[21] Marseille is ranked 86th in the world for business tourism and events, advancing from the 150th spot one year before.[citation needed] The number of congress days hosted on its territory increased from 109,000 in 1996 to almost 300,000 in 2011.[citation needed] They take place in three main sites, Le Palais du Pharo, Le Palais des Congrès et des Expositions (Parc Chanot) and the World Trade Center.[22] In 2012 Marseille hosted the World Water Forum. Several urban projects have been developed to make Marseille attractive. Thus new parks, museums, public spaces and real estate projects aim to improve the city cadre de vie (Parc du 26e Centenaire, Old Port of Marseille,[23] numerous places in Euromediterrannee) to attract firms and people. Marseille municipality acts to develop Marseille as a regional nexus for entertainment in the south of France with high concentration of museums, cinemas, theatres, clubs, bars, restaurants, fashion shops, hotels, and art galleries.

Employment[edit]

Unemployment in the economy fell from 20% in 1995 to 14% in 2004.[24] However, Marseille unemployment rate remains higher than the national average. In some parts of Marseille, youth unemployment is reported to be as high as 40%.[25]

Administration[edit]

The city of Marseille is divided into 16 municipal arrondissements, which are themselves informally divided into quartiers (111 in total). The arrondissements are regrouped in pairs, into 8 secteurs, each with a mayor and council (like the arrondissements in Paris and Lyon).[26]

Municipal elections are held every six years and are carried out by secteur. There are 303 councillors in total, two-thirds sitting in the secteur councils and one third in the city council.

From 1950 to the mid-1990s, Marseille was a socialist and communist stronghold. The socialist Gaston Defferre was consecutively re-elected six times as Mayor of Marseille from 1953 until his death in 1986. He was succeeded by Robert Vigouroux of the RDSE. Jean-Claude Gaudin of the right-wing UMP was elected mayor in 1995. Gaudin was re-elected in 2001 and 2008.

In recent years, the Communist Party has lost most of its strength in the northern boroughs of the city, whereas the far-right National Front has received significant support.

At the last municipal election in 2008, Marseille was divided between the northern boroughs dominated by the left and the more affluent southern part dominated by the right, with the centre and eastern parts of the city as battlegrounds, allowing for a narrow re-election of the UMP administration.

The cantons of Marseille :

Marseille is also divided in 12 cantons, each of them returning two member of the General Council of the Bouches-du-Rhônedépartement.

Mayors[edit]

Population[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1801111,100—    
1851195,350+75.8%
1881360,100+84.3%
1911550,619+52.9%
1931606,000+10.1%
1946636,300+5.0%
1954661,407+3.9%
1962778,071+17.6%
1968889,029+14.3%
1975908,600+2.2%
1982874,436−3.8%
1990800,550−8.4%
1999798,430−0.3%
2006839,043+5.1%
2011850,636+1.4%

Immigration[edit]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(June 2017)

Because of its pre-eminence as a Mediterranean port, Marseille has always been one of the main gateways into France. This has attracted many immigrants and made Marseille a cosmopolitan melting pot. By the end of the 18th century about half the population originated from elsewhere in Provence mostly and also from southern France.[27][page needed]

Economic conditions and political unrest in Europe and the rest of the world brought several other waves of immigrants during the 20th century: Greeks and Italians started arriving at the end of the 19th century and in the first half of the 20th century, up to 40% of the city's population was of Italian origin;[29] Russians in 1917; Armenians in 1915 and 1923; Vietnamese in the 1920s, 1954 and after 1975;[30]Corsicans during the 1920s and 1930s; Spanish after 1936; North Africans (both Arab and Berber) in the inter-war period; Sub-Saharan Africans after 1945; the pieds-noirs from the former French Algeria in 1962; and then from Comoros. In 2006, it was reported that 70,000 city residents were considered to be of Maghrebi origin, mostly from Algeria. The second largest group in Marseille in terms of single nationalities were from the Comoros, amounting to some 45,000 people.[29]

Currently, over one third of the population of Marseille can trace their roots back to Italy.[31] Marseille also has the second-largest Corsican and Armenian

The entrance to the Old Port, flanked by Fort Saint-Jean and Fort Saint-Nicolas
Beach at the Pointe Rouge, Marseille
The sectors and arrondissements of Marseille

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